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Age-Related Macular Degeneration Awareness Month

Age-Related Macular Degeneration Awareness Month

Wednesday, February 03, 2021
Author Montgomery Eye

Tags macular degeneration

What is Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)?

AMD is a disorder of the macula. The macula is the part of your retina where your central and color vision calls home. AMD is a complex disorder where degenerative protein/lipids (called "drusen") deposit under the retina. These deposits are seen in early macular degeneration. As the disease progresses, the retina's structural support system breaks down and can allow abnormal blood vessels to grow or leak fluid and further disrupt the retinal cells. If these blood vessels grow in the macula, then you will lose your central.

AMD is the leading cause of central vision loss in Americans over 50 years old. There are two types of age-related macular degeneration (AMD):

Dry or Nonexudative – This form is quite common. About 80% (8 out of 10) of people who have AMD have the dry form.

Click the American Academy of Ophthalmology link and learn the dry form of age-related macular degeneration.

https://youtu.be/VhGo1jGHFps

Wet or Exudative – This form is less common but much more serious. Wet AMD is when new, abnormal blood vessels grow under the retina.

What are the risk factors?

  • Age: AMD affects more than 2 million Americans over 50 years old. The prevalence of ARMD in the USA is around 6% when 65 and almost 20% when 75 years old.
  • Genetics: have a family history of AMD
  • Smoking: Increases your risk for progression
  • Diet: eating foods high in saturated fat (found in foods like meat, butter, and cheese)
  • Have Certain Diseases: hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease
  • Are Overweight

What is the treatment?

Depending on your type and severity of macular degeneration, many new and exciting treatment options can not only prevent further vision loss, but they can help you regain vision, sometimes even back to 20/20. Discuss your options with your eye doctor.

Look Out for Your Eyesight

Keep up with your eye exams, maintain healthy habits and good safety practices. Your eyes will love you for it!

Show some LOVE to your EYES and Call TODAY to Schedule your Appointment!

334-271-3804

Six Says to Protect Your Eyes from Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Six Says to Protect Your Eyes from Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Wednesday, October 21, 2020
Author Montgomery Eye

Tags macular degeneration, prevention

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of vision loss and blindness in Americans over 50, affecting about 2.1 million people nationwide. Early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to preventing vision loss. Montgomery Eye are educating our patients about the facts on AMD.

AMD is a degenerative disease that happens when part of the retina called the  macula is damaged. It's the part of the eye that delivers sharp, central vision needed to see objects straight ahead. Over time, the loss of central vision can interfere with everyday activities, such as driving, reading, and seeing faces clearly.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology offers these six steps to help patients take control of their eye health:

  1. Get regular comprehensive medical eye exams. AMD often has no early warning signs, so getting regular comprehensive eye exams from an eye doctor is critical to diagnosing and treating eye disease in its early stages. We recommend that adults with no signs or risk factors for eye disease get a baseline eye disease screening at age 40 — the time when early signs of disease and changes in vision may start to occur. By age 65, we recommend getting an exam every year.
  2. Quit smoking. Numerous studies show smoking increases the risk of developing AMD and the speed at which it progresses. Smokers are twice as likely to develop macular degeneration compared with a nonsmoker.
  3. Eat a well-balanced diet. Many studies demonstrate that eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and nutrient-packed foods, such as salmon and nuts, may reduce AMD's risk. Research also suggests that patients who ate fresh fish, an essential source of omega-3s, were at lower risk of developing AMD.
  4. Exercise regularly. Exercising three times a week can reduce the risk of developing wet AMD by 70 percent. Studies also show that physical activity may lower the odds of AMD's early and late stages.
  5. Monitor your sight with an Amsler Grid. This simple, daily routine  takes less than one minute and can help people with AMD save more of their vision. Using this grid is essential to finding any vision changes that are not obvious so that you can report them to your eye doctor.
  6. Know your family's eye health history. If you have a close relative with AMD, you have a 50 percent greater chance of developing the condition. Before your next eye exam, please speak with your family about their eye health history. You may need more frequent eye exams based on your family history.

If you can't remember when your last eye exam, we can help you start your new eye exam appointment calendar today! Your eyes will be happier for it.

334-271-3804

Sources: American Academy of Ophthalmology